Buried Treasure – Review: Workhorse Movement – "Sons of the Pioneers"

Fast Facts
Artist: The Workhorse Movement
Title: “Sons of the Pioneers
Release Date: ’99, I think, but I’m too lazy to look it up.
Standout Tracks: “Livin’ Evil”, “Motown”, “Keep The Sabbath Dream Alive”

How many of you have heard anything by the Workhorse Movement? That’s what I thought. This obscure metal band will be the focus of this week’s Buried Treasure, so put the Limp Bizkit albums away and pay attention while the Workhorse Movement how to blend metal and hip hop properly.

When most people hear “rap metal” they scoff and mutter something derrogatory. If you listen to “Sons of the Pioneers” and still scoff and mutter, you’re clearly not worthy of it anyhow and can go back to your pop punk or whatever.

After an odd but kind of neat intro, the disc’s first actual song is “Keep The Sabbath Dream Alive”. Unlike most rap metal tunes, in which the metal part sticks to the chorus and a usually lousy backbeat inhabits the verses, the metal part in “Keep The Sabbath Dream Alive” forms the beat of the song, and the crunching guitar riffs aren’t just reserved for the refrain. “Livin’ Evil” follows with more of the same, except the music speeds up and the vocals slow down a bit. This song also has an immensely catchy hook, and for that reason alone this song should be heard by everybody at least once.

Between “Livin’ Evil” and the next standout track, “Motown”, is “Gimme Some Skin”, as well as a trio of tracks that nearly made the standout section at the top, “Zero”, “Traffic”(featuring Esham), and “Heavy”. “Zero” features a thumping beat and an interesting tale about the devil trying to find his groove and get some soul to feel. “Traffic” features Esham, who I’ve never heard of, but that’s ok, since the tune is solid with a good beat and tight rhymes. “Heavy” brings more of the same to the table, albeit sans Esham and, as the title suggests, the beat is much heavier.

“Motown” is strange yet fresh blend of styles, employing the usual metal elements, hip hop rhymes, and a horn section. Now I haven’t heard of a metal song with a horn section in it outside of stuff done with an orchestra(such as Metallica’s “S&M”), which makes this song another highlight which should be heard by everybody. Why? Because I said so, that’s why.

A few more tracks go by, then it all wraps up with “Feel Like Bob Marley”, an ode to the late reggae artist. And to smoking weed. Smooth and jazzy, it’s a solid end to a solid album. That’s it from me for now, because I’m lazy and have other stuff that needs doing, so I’ll just leave you with this: “Sons of the Pioneers” is one of the best albums you’ve never heard of. Check it out, or suffer a grisly death at the hands of a million zillion ninjas. Walrus out.

2 thoughts on “Buried Treasure – Review: Workhorse Movement – "Sons of the Pioneers"”

  1. Great column as usual jeff, oh BTW feel free to use the bold and italic html tags in your column if you ever feel inclined i could see how in parts of this is would make some stuff more clear, but it’s not necessary.

    I’ve never heard the workhorse movement… i’m going to have to check them out.

    “How many of you have heard anything by the Workhorse Movement? That’s what I thought. This obscure metal band will be the focus of this week’s Buried Treasure, so put the Limp Bizkit albums away and pay attention while the Workhorse Movement how to blend metal and hip hop properly.”

    hehe, CLASSIC

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